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Ajam Media Collective

Ajamming on tumblr.

Visit us at www.ajammc.com
Apr 4 '14
SNEAK PEAK OF OUR NEXT UPCOMING ARTICLE: Ahmad Zahir, an ‪#‎Afghan‬legacy, singer, and a childhood friend. Memories, personal photographs, and history come together in this beautiful piece. Look out for it next week!
In the meantime, check out Ajam’s #2 Psychedelic Mixtape, which features Ahmad Zahir’s “Laili Laili” here.

SNEAK PEAK OF OUR NEXT UPCOMING ARTICLE: Ahmad Zahir, an ‪#‎Afghan‬legacy, singer, and a childhood friend. Memories, personal photographs, and history come together in this beautiful piece. Look out for it next week!

In the meantime, check out Ajam’s #2 Psychedelic Mixtape, which features Ahmad Zahir’s “Laili Laili” here.

Mar 28 '14

artpipo:

Ridiculously old paintings, but Jean-Baptiste Van Mour is back in the news for his famous depictions of Ottoman fashion. His work contributed to Parisians’ fetish over eastern-style clothing in the 1700s, but who am I kidding, we still fetishize today.  

Mar 28 '14

poppoppopblowblowbubblegum:

A few examples of these marriage contracts from Jewish Iranian families in Mashhad in the late nineteenth century, reflect the lengths to which the Jewish community maintained a Muslim-coded external identity for the sake of their safety after the 1839 Allahdad incident. “Allahdad” refers to a riot that resulted in the killing of over thirty Iranian Jews and the kidnapping of some younger girls in the Mashhadi community, after which many Jews decided to mask their identities and continue living in Mashhad under the guise of being Muslim. The pogrom pushed Mashhadi Jews to hide their identity behind imitations of a Muslim lifestyle. The crypto-Jews, known in Hebrew as the Anusim, were specific to the Mashhadi community—other Iranian Jewish communities were able to practice their religion openly.

These marriage documents, although belonging to these families, mimicked Muslim marriage documents in both presentation and content. The documents were titled with the phrase “in the name of God, most Merciful, most Kind,” and the verse “He is the one who brings hearts together,” phrases taken from the Qur’an and presented in the documents in their original Arabic. The first line of such documents was also formulaic, praising God for the union in a ceremonial form of Arabic. The careful degree to which Jews copied the Muslim contracts demonstrates the conscious effort made towards assimilating to a public Muslim identity; only some names, such as “Ya’qub” (Arabic for Jacob) hint towards a possible Jewish background in the marriage contract.

Despite pressures to conform to an outwardly Muslim appearance, some families managed to preserve their identity in written form as well. Some marriage contracts embraced a hybrid expression of Muslim and Jewish practices.This one, for example, has two identical pages: one in Hebrew and Aramaic, and the other in Arabic and Persian. The combining of these languages and collapsing of identities in marriage documents similarly encapsulates the critical social and political pressures on the Mashhadi Jewish community. It is possible that the family had two contracts made, one for display, and one for themselves to reflect their Jewish identity. 

read more about marriage contracts and the mashhadi jewish community here and listen to a talk here.

One of our EIC wrote that piece! Go read it, everyone! 

Mar 20 '14

From our Ajam family to yours, Happy Nowruz

 

Ajam Mixtape #3: Sounds of Nowruz

Mar 19 '14

haftseen:

Pennsylvania, USA

"the making of a haft seen." 

Mar 19 '14
haftseen:

Northern Virginia, USA

haftseen:

Northern Virginia, USA

Mar 19 '14
haftseen:

UT Austin, Texas, USA

Goldfish crackers are always a good substitute. 

haftseen:

UT Austin, Texas, USA

Goldfish crackers are always a good substitute. 

Mar 18 '14
Tehran Pet Hospital is showcasing photos of pets with Haft-Seen for the upcoming Iranian New Year on Thursday!Haft-Seen is a traditional table setting of Nowruz, a spring celebration on March 21 marked in Iran, Afghanistan, Kurdistan, Central Asia, South Asia, the Caucasus, and parts of the Balkans, among other places around the world. Various religious groups such as Zoroastrians, Bahais, and Shias, namely Twelvers, Alevis, Alawites, and Ismailis commemorate the day. The Haft-Seen table includes seven items all starting with the letter seen (س) in the Persian alphabet.Check out more pictures of pets with Haft-Seen at the Tehran Pet Hospital:https://www.facebook.com/TehranPet

Tehran Pet Hospital is showcasing photos of pets with Haft-Seen for the upcoming Iranian New Year on Thursday!

Haft-Seen is a traditional table setting of Nowruz, a spring celebration on March 21 marked in Iran, Afghanistan, Kurdistan, Central Asia, South Asia, the Caucasus, and parts of the Balkans, among other places around the world. Various religious groups such as Zoroastrians, Bahais, and Shias, namely Twelvers, Alevis, Alawites, and Ismailis commemorate the day. 

The Haft-Seen table includes seven items all starting with the letter seen (س) in the Persian alphabet.

Check out more pictures of pets with Haft-Seen at the Tehran Pet Hospital:https://www.facebook.com/TehranPet

Mar 18 '14
Photo: Young men jump over a fire as they celebrate Chaharshanbe Suri in Herat, Afghanistan, 2013.Chahārshanbe Suri (Persian: چهارشنبه ‌سوری) is a fire jumping festival that occurs on the last Wednesday eve before Nowruz (tonight!), which marks the first day of spring and the first day of the Persian New Year.Bonfires are lit to “keep the sun alive,” and the celebration usually starts in the evening, with people making bonfires in the streets and jumping over them singing “zardi-ye man az toh, sorkhi-ye toh az man”. The literal translation is, “my yellow is yours, your red is mine,” meaning you want the fire to take your pallor, sickness, and problems and in turn give you redness, warmth, and energy.(Aref Karimi/AFP/Getty Images)

Photo: Young men jump over a fire as they celebrate Chaharshanbe Suri in Herat, Afghanistan, 2013.

Chahārshanbe Suri (Persian: چهارشنبه ‌سوری) is a fire jumping festival that occurs on the last Wednesday eve before Nowruz (tonight!), which marks the first day of spring and the first day of the Persian New Year.

Bonfires are lit to “keep the sun alive,” and the celebration usually starts in the evening, with people making bonfires in the streets and jumping over them singing “zardi-ye man az toh, sorkhi-ye toh az man”. The literal translation is, “my yellow is yours, your red is mine,” meaning you want the fire to take your pallor, sickness, and problems and in turn give you redness, warmth, and energy.

(Aref Karimi/AFP/Getty Images)

Mar 18 '14
Iranian pop singer sisters Haideh and Mahasti jumping over fire for Charshanbeh Suri on the cover of Ettela’at Weekly magazine, March 14, 1975 (23 Farvardin 1353).Notice the two articles mentioned on the cover of the magazine: on the left about the Rastakhiz Party, which the Shah had established 2 weeks prior to serve as the country’s sole political party, and on the right about spring fashions for women in Tehran!

Iranian pop singer sisters Haideh and Mahasti jumping over fire for Charshanbeh Suri on the cover of Ettela’at Weekly magazine, March 14, 1975 (23 Farvardin 1353).

Notice the two articles mentioned on the cover of the magazine: on the left about the Rastakhiz Party, which the Shah had established 2 weeks prior to serve as the country’s sole political party, and on the right about spring fashions for women in Tehran!